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Posted in TV/Books/Films | 4 comments

The Phenomenon That She is

You know those people who you can’t like but can’t ignore either? We all have a set of those in our lives.

When I watched the movie Gone With The Wind, I did not particularly like Scarlett. Throughout the movie (a very long one which is), I kept thinking how can a woman so perfect on the outside be so imperfect on the inside. Considered not very beautiful in the conventional sense, Scarlett very well knew how to ‘toy with the boys’ and make herself their object of affection.

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Gone With The Wind is a journey, of a girl who’s all of 16 to her womanhood. The character is so neatly cut out, that by the end of the saga you know the phenomenon that Scarlett O’Hara is, in and out.

She’s spoiled and wicked. The fact that she marries a man just to get back at her ultimate love interest says a lot about her persona. She is widowed early and it doesn’t affect her emotionally much, and rightly so because she is still in love with Ashley, who is happily married to another woman. At one point, Scarlett nurses Ashley’s ailing wife with the intention of winning Ashley’s heart. Scarlett doesn’t give up, you see!

She is selfish, and her insecurities lead her to marry again (this time her sister’s beau) only to lose her second husband too to death. Her life voyages her from being a carefree, whimsical girl to starving in the stomach and heart. While it begins with her living in a happy world, she reaches rock bottom and in the course of it, kills a man too. But like all of us, she has her way of dealing with things. When something goes haywire and she sees no immediate way out, she reassuringly tells herself

“I can’t think about that right now. If I do, I’ll go crazy. I’ll think about that tomorrow. “

Now isn’t that a cool advice to self? Scarlett finds it apt to say this when she commits the unplanned murder or even when Rhett walks out on her.

Oh I almost forgot to mention Rhett here, just as Scarlett did. Rhett was one man who loved her despite her flaws and imperfections. He was also her third husband, but Scarlett was too blinded by her selfish meanderings, she took him for granted all along. He was an intelligent, rich man who truly loved her but she realized she loved him too a bit too late. Rhett walks out on a crying Scarlett who begs him to stay. She tried to tell him that she would have nowhere to go if he left, to which Rhett replies this famous line:

“Frankly, my dear, I don’t give a damn.”

Scarlett sure wants him back but doesn’t know how. So she tells herself, “I can’t think about that right now. If I do, I’ll go crazy. I’ll think about that tomorrow. “

She plans to move back to Tara, her motherland. She feels that’s where she now belonged.

Although I did not like her much, as mentioned before, here I am – with a blog-post on her. That’s what Scarlett O’Hara truly is.

4 Comments

  1. We know she is weak and frivolous and mean and all those things, and yet we love her because she has spunk. I loved her character when I first read it, but on second reading I didn’t and haven’t touched it since. How did you like the movie?

    • I read the book in bits and pieces, blame it on my lack of patience. The movie is what inspired me to write this post.

  2. I saw this movie aeons ago,the only thing i remember is “frankly my dear,i don’t give a damn”

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